Issues

Darroch Lozowski
#64 - November 2021
A Year of Carte Blanche & Other Chimeras

The Unsaid

by Vivian Darroch-Lozowski
Lydia sponge 3
#64 - November 2021 Short Story

Being Beside Oneself, 2

Part 2 of a selection of writing by Lydia Davies
ML Dyrness Dreamer I
#64 - November 2021
A Year of Carte Blanche & Other Chimeras

The Dreamer I

by Tristan Foster
Phases of Matter2
#63 - September 2021 Essay

The intimate boundaries of Istanbul

Helen Mackreath explores the city through three films
Valentines Day and Candy at Einsteins as part of the GWL Welcome Wall display
#63 - October 2021 Review

Art work

James Bell reviews Life Support: Forms of Care in Art and Activism at the Glasgow Women’s Library
Alicia Reyes Mc Namara living with Maria de Lima
#63 - September 2021 ‘Living With’

Alicia Reyes McNamara Living With Maria de Lima

Part 4 of Living With: 6 artists, 6 homes
Afterness4
#62 - June 2021 Review

Weeds on War

Rose Higham-Stainton reflects on Orford Ness in Suffolk and site-specific artworks by Alice Channer, Tatiana Trouvé, Emma McNally and others
Glasgow International2021 2
#62 - June 2021 Review

Domestic politics in Glasgow International 2021

A survey by Victoria Horne
Newt on allotment
#62 - June 2021

Twenty twenty one eclipse

MAP: summer season
TT CT cold talk
#61 - May 2021 Camara Taylor X SBWN

COLD TALK

On 29 November 2020 Camara Taylor and Tako Taal met to talk about ‘the cold’: a condensation of their conversation is offered here.
Microbursts
#61 - April 2021 Review

microbursts by Elizabeth Reeder & Amanda Thomson

A review by Loll Jung
Steph Mann Image 3 MAP web
#61 - May 2021 Reflection

Things, tunnels, traces, thoughts: Part Three

Tom Jeffreys’ response to new work by Stephanie Mann concludes
Stainedglass
#60 - March 2021 MAP Project

TENANCY Part 12: Public Transports

a conversation between So Mayer and Sarah Turner
I1 Irish land League
#60 - March 2021 Essay

Contemporary art can be whatever it wants to be

Delimiting the politics of contemporary art (in relation to a three year long project at the Cooper Gallery, Dundee) by Colm Guo-Lin Peare
Martha main
#60 - February 2021 Camara Taylor X SBWN

Before Emergence: A Means of Break/age

by Martha Adonai Williams
Impacts sts7crack
#59 - September 2020 Editorial

Collisions

Editorial: tying up cosmic symbolism
Sarah Tripp book
#59 - December 2020 MAP Editions

The Self-Illuminating Pen by Sarah Tripp

A notebook of letters, writing exercises and over 100 blank pages, published by MAP Editions
Screenshot 2020 09 27 at 22 07 39
#59 - October 2020 MAP Project

TENANCY Part 7: Make it Safe

by No Matter
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#58 - June 2020 Editorial

SHIFTING HOSTS, ORBITAL MOONS

Common Understandings small
#58 - August 2020 Essay

Demystification Through Participation

Theo Carnegy-Tan considers Ruth Beale’s call to engage, belong, and re-common the commons
Method Foronda2019 small
#58 - September 2020 Letters

Writings between

Taking Time: Part one of a series of correspondences between Caroline Gausden and Jen Clarke on the politics of hosting and hospitality
Tako Taal A Body 2019 Photo credit Juliane Foronda small
#58 - September 2020 Letters

WRITINGS BETWEEN

Bodies of Knowledge: Part two of a series of correspondences between Caroline Gausden and Jen Clarke on the politics of hosting and hospitality
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#57 - May 2020 Editorial

A Flickering in the Store Cupboard

Funny Weather
#57 - May 2020 Review

Different kinds of now

Anna Chapman Parker reads Funny Weather, Art in an Emergency by Olivia Laing, Picador, London 2020
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#57 - May 2020 Review

Attention Economies

William Kherbek attends Glasgow International’s Digital Programme 23 April - 31 May 2020
Baked Alsakalarge
#57 - May 2020 Recollections

LIONISING

Calum Sutherland reflects on Charlotte Prodger’s ‘SaF05’ and the lions of Venice during a trip to the Biennale in 2019
Contact 1997 dir
#56 - March 2020 Editorial

Staying Close

Contact, proximity and hello
Cordelia Oliver photograph copy
#56 - May 2020 Women Painting: Scottish Art 1940-1980

Introduction

Susannah Thompson and Marianne Greated introduce a MAP mini series, part of their recently launched, ongoing project Women Painting: Scottish Art 1940-1980
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#56 - April 2020 Review

Feeling Around in the Dark

Rhea Storr visited Steve McQueen at Tate Modern, London before lockdown and found a masterclass in taking care of the dead
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#56 - March 2020 Journal

STAY AT HOME MOVIES

Herb Shellenberger guides us through a selection of moving-image works newly available for remote viewing
Shona Macnaughton Copy
#55 - January 2020 Review

12 Hour Non-State Parade

Angeliki Roussou attended the Cooper Gallery’s marathon symposium in Dundee at the end of last year and found it ‘…surgically curated, perfectly executed, homely and inclusive’. Read more of her report here
Until Now
#55 - January 2020 Review

Anna Maria Maiolino

Maria Howard responds to this extraordinary Brazilian artist’s retrospective, Making Love Revolutionary, at the Whitechapel Gallery, London until 12 January 2020
Rhea  Jess
#55 - February 2020 MAP Event

you, there, are you there? | MAP at Glasgow Film Festival 2020

Event over. A programme of short film, artist moving image and performance curated by Rosie Roberts and including work by Rhea Storr, Jessica Higgins, Alex Culshaw and Alison Scott. Wednesday, 4 March, 6pm. CCA Cinema
Bhanu Kapil
#54 - November 2019 MAP Reading Group

Penetrate: Translate reading group

Session Four. Ban en Banlieue by Bhanu Kapil. CCA, Monday 25 November, 6.30pm
Photo Bhanu In England
#54 - December 2019

Mini interview with Bhanu Kapil

Is psychosis particulate? Does it turn the air a light pink, a tint like yellow? Catalina Barroso-Luque asks writer Bhanu Kapil about psychosis, performance, public versus private. We are delighted to publish this short correspondence as part of Penetrate: Translate, a MAP reading group
Capildeo3
#54 - November 2019 MAP Reading Group

Penetrate: Translate reading group

Session three. Vahni Capildeo, Measures of Expatriation. CCA, Monday 11 November, 6.30pm
Day I 4
#53 - September 2019 New writing series

The Residency: Part 1

James N. Hutchinson’s three-part narrative is situated in and around Inshriach Bothy. ‘What on Earth?… The whippet has no answer.’
Bothy Before
#53 - September 2019 New writing series

BEFORE, ROAD, INTUITION

Three texts by Sarah Rose. “I remember the score Native by composer Pauline Oliveros which instructs us to, ‘Take a walk at night. Walk so silently that the bottom of your feet become ears.’”
Sian Creature
#53 - September 2019 New writing series

Creature

by Siân Robinson Davies. ‘Living alone for the first time, a new side of herself emerges.’
Eternity Knocker2
#52 - August 2019 Interview

Eternity Knocker, as discussed…

Calum Sutherland talks to Andrew Black about Eternity Knocker. Black’s film is showing at CCA Intermedia Fri 9 Aug — Sun 1 Sep, 2019
Gardenlust 10 Image 1
#52 - September 2019 Column

Gardenlust #10: The Slug Murderers

A monthly column by Isabella Streffen
Jim Lambie Sticky Fingers 2010
#52 - August 2019 Review

Cut and Paste: 400 Years of Collage

National Galleries of Scotland, Modern Two. Until 27 Oct 2019. Review by Victoria Horne
Lituania 2 Copy
#51 - August 2019 Interview series

Part 6: ‘Matter as a Hope of Finding Some Answers.’ LITHUANIA

‘We opened a military zone to the public that had never before been seen, not even by locals.’ Lucia Pietroiusti, curator of the Lithuanian Pavilion, which was awarded 2019’s Golden Lion, participates in our interview series that sets questions in response to Ralph Rugoff’s Venice Biennale exhibition title, ‘May You Live in Interesting Times’.
Latvia 3 Copy
#51 - August 2019 Interview series

Part 7: ‘Matter as a Hope of Finding Some Answers.’ LATVIA

‘Opening up even more, instead of closing in around national borders, should be the response.’ Curators Valentinas Klimašauskas and Inga Lāce continue our 15 part season.
Bulgaria 2 Copy
#51 - August 2019 Interview series

Part 5: ‘Matter as a Hope of Finding Some Answers.’ BULGARIA

Eastern European countries exhibiting at the Venice Biennale 2019 were interviewed by Manca Bajec and Isobel Wohl. Responses here by curator Vera Mlechevska and artists Lazar Lyutakov and Rada Boukova.
I Fell In Love With A Tree
#50 - March 2019 Column

Gardenlust #6: Cherry Blossom Girl

A monthly column by Isabella Streffen
Cian Dayrit 2261
#50 - June 2019 Review

Beyond the God’s Eye, Cian Dayrit

NOME, Berlin, 27 Apr-12 Jun, 2019. Review by William Kherbek
It Is Composed Of Parts Image Hannah Nussbaum
#50 - May 2019 Short Story

It is Composed of Parts

A short story by Hannah Nussbaum
Dorothea Tanning Family Portrait
#49 - March 2019

Dorothea Tanning: A Canine State of Mind

Natalie Ferris on the artist’s retrospective at Tate Modern and communion with the animal world
Gif2
#49 - March 2019

The Microbiota

A speculative bacterial glossary from A+E Collective
Dz5
#49 - March 2019 Essay

A golden interweaving link

Anna McLauchlan visits the D’Arcy Thompson Zoology Museum, Dundee
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#48 - February 2019 MAP Event

Pinochet Porn — Ellen Cantor’s dark feature at Glasgow Film Festival 2019

A MAP screening curated by artist Georgia Horgan
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#48 - February 2019 Review

Crone Music

Philomena Epps reviews Beatrice Gibson at Camden Arts Centre, London, 18 January - 31 March
Fig3
#48 - January 2019 Journal

The word ‘Tradition’ with several circles around it indicating it’s been alluded to multiple times in a conversation

Third in a series of research texts by Gordon Douglas reporting on encounters with collaborative practice in Japan
Mostly No Ipad Version Copy
#47 - September 2018 Essay

Mostly No

Sarah Bernstein reflects on solitary women in the fiction of Muriel Spark
Miss St
#47 - October 2018 Review

Electric Speech

Emma Balkind reviews Telephone by Ariana Reines, published by Wonder
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#47 - November 2018 Column

Gardenlust #2: The Firework Border

A monthly column by Isabella Streffen
Lovelyyet Mainimage
#46 - September 2018 MAP Editions

is it lovely yet?

an essay by Hannah Van Hove
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#46 - August 2018 Review

New Order, Other Spaces

Lucy Weir writes on an exhibition by Jo Longhurst exploring the personal and professional in competitive gymnastics. Kelvin Hall, Glasgow, 2 - 12 August
Naked And Practical Cover
#46 - July 2018 Review

Naked and Practical

Amy Todman reviews a new collection of short stories, scenes and fragments by Siân Robinson Davies, published by tenletters
Unnamed 7
#45 - June 2018 Review

Chapter Eight

The eighth instalment of Out of Office Auto-Reply by Jeremy Millar
Footnote16
#45 - May 2018 MAP Editions

Do Not Make The

The Moving Image Chapters
Chapter 2
#45 - May 2018 Review

Chapter Two

The second instalment of Out of Office Auto-Reply by William Kherbek
Peel Eezy Gi
#44 - April 2018 MAP Event

We Who Are About To… MAP for GLASGOW INTERNATIONAL 2018

Dates and times of all project events, including shop opening times
Esther Ferrer 23Apr Gi2018 3 Of 4
#44 - April 2018 Interview

Esther Ferrer

Mónica Laiseca talks to the Spanish artist who has recently performed at Glasgow International 2018
Peel Eezy The Critic
#44 - May 2018 Short Story

The Tear in the Work Shop, and Post-Office Performance, and the Peel Eezy Review

By The Critic: proudly ghost-written by Andy Grace Hayes. Commissioned by Peel Eezy. All persons fictitious
1280Px Panopticon
#43 - March 2018 Essay

Eyes on the Street

New writing from Martin Cathcart Froden on carceral architecture, satellite mapping, knitting in prison, shark species and the correct spelling of ‘dyslexia’ 
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#43 - March 2018 Editorial

a gray stone wall damming my stream

Editorial: a new season of reviews and features focusing on carcerality, limit and contained energies
Hannah Leighton Boyce More Energy Than Object More Force Than Form 2018Detail Photo © Drew Forsyth 1
#43 - March 2018 Review

Consequences of progress; remnants for the future

Jazmine Linklater on mutability in the works of Ruth Barker and Hannah Leighton-Boyce at Castlefield Gallery, Manchester, 9 March - 29 April
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#42 - January 2018 Review

Fissile States

Editorial: Daisy Lafarge introduces this issue  
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#42 - December 2017 Review

so you see me

Lucy Weir reviews Ulay: so you see me, a solo exhibition at Cooper Gallery, Dundee, 27 October - 16 December 
Megan Rooney Perf Tram 13
#42 - December 2017 MAP Event

Others got wings for flying: performance

Others got wings for flying, the MAP commission 2017, in collaboration with Megan Rooney, arrived at its conclusion with the premiere of Rooney’s eponymous performance at Tramway, Glasgow
1  Leontios Toumpouris
#42 - February 2018 Review

Physical or Otherwise 

Gwendolen Dupré on the alchemy of Suggestions and Encounters: Physical or Otherwise by Leontios Toumpouris at The Telfer Gallery, Glasgow, 9 February - 4 March 
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#41 - October 2017 Review

Circumstantial Evidence

Kirsty Hendry responds to ‘Every contact leaves a trace’ curated by Naomi Pearce, a LUX screening at Glasgow Film Theatre, 1 October
This Little Art
#41 - October 2017 Review

This Little Art

Sohini Basak reviews This Little Art by Kate Briggs, Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2017
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#41 - October 2017 Review

Country Grammar

Ruth Barker reviews ‘Country Grammar’ by Sue Tompkins (featuring work by Luke Fowler) at The Modern Institute Aird’s Lane, Glasgow, 30 September - 4 November
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#40 - September 2017 Review

Objects I Have Been

A reviews season in the ekphrastic mode
Eggs
#40 - September 2017 Review

Nests

Mike Saunders on ‘Natural Selection’ by Andy Holden and Peter Holden, at Former Newington Library, London 10 September - 5 November
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#40 - October 2017 Review

By Likeness

Lila Matsumoto’s ekphrastic response to ‘Artificial Sensibility’ by It’s Our Playground at Bonnington Gallery, Nottingham, 22 September - 27 October
Mai Tn  Showstoppers
#40 - September 2017 Review

Showstoppers

Calum Gardner responds to ‘Showstoppers - Silver Centrepieces’ at Temple Newsam House, Leeds, 13 May - 15 October
Geta 3
#39 - August 2017 Review

Notes from Venice

Claire Walsh offers notes from the Venice Biennale ‘Viva Arte Viva’ 13 May - 26 November
Divided  Self 1
#39 - July 2017 Review

The Restless Image

Philomena Epps on Rose Finn-Kelcey: Life, Belief and Beyond at Modern Art Oxford, 15 July - 15 October
Ar Diane On Table1
#39 - July 2017 Review

Diane Torr 1948-2017

Giles Bailey offers a personal tribute to interdisciplinary artist, inspirational teacher and drag king, Diane Torr
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#38 - May 2017 Review

Conflict Materials

Tom White reviews Conflict Minerals: Lise Autogena & Joshua Portway / Nabil Ahmed, at Arts Catalyst Centre for Art, Science and Technology, 24 March-22 April, 2017
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#38 - April 2017

This can only be thought of as a monologue within a dialogue

This day long programme for the ECA School of Art Friday Talk series, was curated by Suzanne van der Lingen and Claire Walsh. Presented on 24 March, 2017, the full programme and images, published here, document the occasion
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#38 - January 2017 Review

Once you cut off your braid, where do you reattach it?

Tereza Hrušková reviews the exhibition ’33 – ’29 – ’36 at UM Gallery, Prague, until 25 February  
Maifootnoting 1
#37 - January 2016

PREFACE

Suzanne van der Lingen & Claire Walsh introduce their 2016 MAP editorial project
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#37 - December 2016

Unknown Outcomes

Debi Banerjee and Kirsty Hendry introduce ‘Unknown Outcomes’ - a website assembling the material collected and produced throughout their collaboration with Ted Odling’s archival material. Developed by designer Neil McGuire, ‘Unknown Outcomes’ is a meditation on the role of systems in structuring and legitimising information and knowledge.
#37 - July 2016

a childish tune plays a keyboard anthem

A footnote by Aniela Piasecka to ‘Made to be Broken’, a collaboration with Paloma Proudfoot presented as part of Platform: 2016 at Edinburgh Art Festival
#37 - June 2016

‘Difficult Mothers’ | new solo exhibition by Sarah Rose

Image 1
#36 - December 2015

The Hollow Mountain

Voice in the live performance of Maria Fusco’s, ‘Master Rock’, by Claire Walsh
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#36 - November 2015

SEEING SCOTLAND: Gazes and Articulations

Essay by Tiffany Boyle, writing for Mother Tongue
#36 - November 2015

‘Whose Gaelic is it anyway?’ Identity and perception

By Glasgow-based musician, Cassie Ezeji
Mai How  To  Fake  Your  Own  Death3
#35 - August 2015

How to Fake Your Own Death

The characters in this text are fictitious and any resemblance to persons living or dead is purely coincidental. Essay film by Suzanne van der Lingen
Readers 1
#35 - August 2015 MAP Reading Group

Thank you for writing to me so often, you are revealing yourself to me in the only way you can

Laura Edbrook reflects on the reading and discussion group ‘Sick Sick Sick: The Books of Ornery Women’ co-run with Emma Balkind and presented by MAP between autumn 2013 and autumn 2014. ‘Sick Sick Sick’ was an open reading project based online and at the CCA, Glasgow and examined a radical or ‘bludgeoned’ subjectivity of female writers
Nervous Skies
#35 - August 2015

Nervous Skies

Nervous Skies is a transatlantic collaboration between Amelia Bande, Deborah Bower, Annette Knol and Mat Fleming. An installation of 16mm film, slides and text shown in multiple projections, it was first exhibited at the NewBridge Project, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, in April and May 2015. Essay by Susannah Thompson
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#34 - February 2015

Voicing the Silences

Essay by Sarah Neely just published in A Feminist Chorus, an 80 page risograph printed bookwork. Purchase from info@mapmagazine.
#34 - March 2015

~~~~

Audrey Reynolds prose poems 1, 2, 3 and 4.
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#34 - March 2015 Review

O.K. Rick [Review]

Jenny Brownrigg responds to the Florrie James work screened in February at the Glasgow Film Festival.
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#33 - November 2010 MAP Editions

A Feminist Chorus: Publication

To purchase a copy contact us on info@mapmagazine.co.uk
You Are Prouvost
#33 - February 2015 Glasgow Film Festival

MAP Screen | READING IN THE DARK

Curated by Suzanne van der Lingen | Instalment 2: Gerard Byrne, Sarah Forrest, Laure Prouvost, Peter Rose | Readings by Laura Edbrook & Sarah Forrest and Suzanne van der Lingen | Screened 25 February. Event images online  
A  Feminist  Chorus Recording 21  March 2014
#33 - February 2015

A Feminist Chorus: ‘Hen Run’ sound work at RIBA, London

Installed as part of Mackintosh Architecture, 18 February-23 May 2015.
#32 - September 2014

MAP at Platform

‘A Feminist Chorus’ film screening during 21 Revolutions exhibition at Platform, Glasgow, 7 November—7 December, 2014
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#32 - October 2014 MAP Reading Group

‘Sick Sick Sick’ : The Books of Ornery Women

Session Seven : CCA Cinema, Thu 30 Oct, 6.30pm, reading ‘Literal Madness’ by Kathy Acker
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#32 - June 2014 MAP Reading Group

‘Sick Sick Sick’ : The Books of Ornery Women

A reading project examining a radical or ‘bludgeoned’ subjectivity of female writers | Session Six : 6.30pm, CCA Cinema, Thu 25 Sep : reading Love Dog by Masha Tupitsyn
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#31 - May 2014

Unmastered, Remastered by Katherine Angel & The Blackburn Company

Curated reading of the book ‘Unmastered / A Book On Desire, Most Difficult to Tell’
#31 - April 2014 MAP Reading Group

‘Sick Sick Sick’ : The Books of Ornery Women

A reading project examining a radical or ‘bludgeoned’ subjectivity of female writers | Session Five, Travis Jeppeson, The Suiciders, CCA Clubroom, Thursday 29 May, 6.30pm
Lucy  Reynolds
#31 - February 2014

Lucy Reynolds: Talks

Glasgow School of Art, Friday Event at the Glasgow Film Theatre, 11am—12:30pm, 14 February 2014 | Edinburgh College of Art, Friday Talk, Main Lecture Theatre, 11.30am—1pm, 28 March 2014 
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#30 - November 2013 MAP Reading Group

‘Sick Sick Sick’ : The Books of Ornery Women

A reading project examining a radical or ‘bludgeoned’ subjectivity of women writers | Session One
#30 - November 2013

MAP Screen | The Anthropology Effect

For the second installment of MAP Screen, Karen Cunningham selects three works—two clips from vintage television documentaries presented by David Attenborough and John Grierson and a video piece by Glasgow-based artist David Sherry
#30 - November 2013

In the Shadow of the Hand : Object 8

Virginia Hutchison reads Object 8 : The Rock
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#29 - August 2013 MAP Reading Group

‘Sick Sick Sick’ : The Books of Ornery Women

A reading group examining a radical or ‘bludgeoned’ subjectivity of female writers
#29 - August 2013

In the Shadow of the Hand : Object 7b

A witness statement in the form of a text, produced in response to Object 6b ‘The Idea’. A collaborative project by Sarah Forrest and Virginia Hutchison
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#29 - August 2013

Notes on Contemporary Art and Anthropology

Part 1: Magic, Value, Gifts and Scams. An essay by Angela McClanahan  
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#28 - February 2013

MAP Screen | Dancing With Myself

‘Dance (All Night, Paris)’ by Melanie Manchot was part a programme guest curated by Debi Banerjee. Its run is now over, but a text remains to view here.
#28 - February 2013

Spaces between sound and vision

Neil Cooper investigates a growing interest in sound and art collaborations 
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#28 - April 2013

In the Shadow of the Hand : Object 5a

‘Object Removed’ A collaborative project by Sarah Forrest and Virginia Hutchison
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#27 - December 2012

The gatekeepers’ movements invent another language

Laura Edbrook’s text was written to accompany the video work ‘The End is the Beginning’
Maie 1
#27 - December 2012

The End is the Beginning

MAP presents new work by Mhari McMullan & Urara Tsuchiya with score and video edit by Nick Packer
Mai Mojoverhead
#26 - November 2012

Muscles of Joy—No-One’s Little Girls Shouting Out Loud

Neil Cooper looks at a year in the life of Glasgow-based band, Muscles of Joy
#26 - November 2012

Slow dissolve to—

Room Interior. Closed Door. She walks slowly through scene and exits, by Laura Edbrook and Ailsa Lochhead
#26 - November 2012

Not a Lighthouse

“She thought about deliberately reflecting a mistake, and what form this new mistake would take, and what this new mistake would mean” by Rebecca Wilcox  
M25 Cover

MAP #24 includes profiles on Mladen Stilinovic by Mary Rinebold, Karla Black by Briony Fer, a conversation with Sophie Macpherson and Clare Stephenson about their new collaborative performance work, and a text on art as a 'metavocation' by Sean Ashton.

The MAP commission is by Mary Simpson, and the artist text is by Lisa Oppenheim.

Aoife Rosenmeyer and John Calcutt profile emerging artists Iman Issa and Nicolas Party respectively, while Karen Archey reports on the strategy of timeliness in the contemporary work of Moyra Davey, Alan Michael, Cory Arcangel and Matthew Monahan.

The Cinenova Working Group outline their notion of moving image distribution and its attendent labour economies, while Laura Edbrook examines Smith/Stewart's collaborative intimacies.

Focus reviewsinclude Berlin Gallery Weekend by Steven Cairns and full page reviews of The Erratics, Hayley Tompkins, Nicolas Deshayes, Laure Prouvost, Young British Art, Still Life, Christopher Williams, Józef Robakowski, Theaster Gates. Akram Zaatari, How to Work and Simon Denny

Reviewed books discuss the notions of publishing artists and artist publishing: Gwen Allen's Artists' Magazines, and collaborative artist's book Activity.

The back page is written and configured by Grace Schwindt.

Map24  Cover

MAP #24 includes profiles on Alasdair Gray by Neil Mulholland, BS Johnson by Isla Leaver-Yap, Stuart Gurden by John Calcutt, Clément Rodzielski by Joanna Fiduccia, while Giles Bailey and Marie de Brugerolle discuss Guy de CointetTom Burr talks to Steven Cairns, and Sean Ashton writes about Embedded Art. The MAP commission is by Shahryar Nashat, and the artist text is by Matt Keegan.

Gemma Sharpe and Rebecca Geldard profile emerging artists Audrey Reynolds and Patrizio Di Massimo respectively, and Karen Archey examines the role of internet art in the 21st century. Dominic Patterson discusses Christine Borland’s recent residency and exhibition at Glasgow Sculpture Studios, and new organisation The Serving Library outline their mission.

Focus reviewsincludethe 29th São Paulo Biennial by Tobi Maier and Manifesta 8 by Sarah Lowndes, as well as full page reviews of Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Alex Pollard, Exhibition Exhibition, Yves Netzhammer, Paul Thek, Adrian Piper, Conceptual Art in Canada1965–1980, British Art Show 7, Elizabeth McAlpine, and Keith Farquhar.

In Print features discussions of Show & Tell: A Chronicle of Group Material, and Katinka Bock – Works. Oeuvres. Werke, and Events include the Serpentine Map Marathon and recent Duvet Brothers performance.

Map 23 Cover

MAP #23 includes features on Andrea Büttner by Richard Birkett, Performance, Land Art and Photography by Francesco Gagliardi, Simon Dybbroe Møller by Dorothee Brill, Kelly Nipper by Joanna Fiduccia, The Devil Makes Work by Fiona Jardine and interviews with Emily Wardill by Hans Ulrich Obrist, and Jonathan Horowitz by Steven Cairns.

Emerging artists Cara Tolmie and Katarina Zdjelar are profiled by Will Holder and Aoife Rosenmeyer, and we hear from Yvonne Rainer on her upcoming projects. Anita Di Bianco talks to Discoteca Flaming Star and we get the low down from the US and UK on arts funding by Jennifer Thatcher and Paddy Johnson.

We have Focus reviews of the Edinburgh Art Festival by Dominic Paterson and 6th Berlin Biennale by Steven Cairns and Joanna Fiduccia and full page reviews of Knut Åsdam, Jorge Santos, Gert and Uwe Tobias, Lila de Magalhaes / Michael White, The Potosí Principle, David Hominal, Francis Alÿs, Jack Pierson, The Long Dark, Dynasty.

We look at David Toop's Sinister Resonance and Susanne Kriemann's Ashes and Broken Brickwork of a Logical Theory in our In Print reviews, and cover recent performances by Ian White and Sharon Hayes.

M22  P00  Cover

The authority of the voice and its displacement is the leitmotif of Map 22.  We ask what kind of voice can one achieve in collaboration and question who can be held accountable for its collective utterances.  From the trio of avant-garde filmakers Kenneth Macpherson , Bryther and HD, who made up the reactionary POOL group, to the three young contemporary painters Fiona MackayManuela Gernedel and Morag Keil, the unified voice of collaboration is shown to produce bursts of unlikely creativity that would be impossible alone.

From the standpoint of the individual practice too, MAP examines the synthetic aspects of the artist's voices.  In the first presentation of her New York project, From the Centre of the Elephant, artist Jesse Jones flirts with the possession and inhabits a series of ghostly voices in MAP, where she presents a gothic piece of fiction intertwined with haunting images.  

Pablo Helguera attempts to answer a series of unanswerable questions in his slippery interview with Karen Archey, speaking from his multiple positions as a critic, curator and artist.  Jimmie Durham's special new commission for MAP, made on residency in Glasgow, amalgamtes voices from the past and rearranges their symbolic order. 

In our review focus, the launch of Glasgow International also provides a proliferation of voices from MAP's team of writers who attempt to bring in the perspective from scattered points across the city.  Throughout the issue, then, MAP finds itself in rich, polyvocal territory.

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MAP's two–year residency at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design in Dundess has come to an end and we'd like to extend our sincere thanks to the exhibitions and fine art departments for being such generous hosts.

True to our nomadic practice we're now moving on. From 20 Februar we can be contacted at our new address at Glasgow's Centre for Contemporary Arts, where we look forward to a two–year stay in a city that has become known for its dynamic and varied art scene, one which continues to influence art production both locally and beyond. Working from these bases in Scotland, as well as locations abroad and online, we build relationships directly with the communities the magazine reflects and informs.

MAP meanwhile continues to seek alternative wasys to engage with critical writing and publishing. Collective concerns and peripatetic practice are both eveident in this issue. Berlin–based curatorial duo Silberkuppe have, within a year, developed an exciting exhibition model which relies heavily on collective gathering and thinking and can move around the world freely. Ben Rivers has been visiting islands areound the world on a quest for knowledge. Mary Redmond reveals a glimpse of her research from abroad and Glasgow–based artists Katy Dove and Victoria Morton, who work independantly in a studio context, are also becoming more interested in collaboratng with others, most particulary was members of the band, Muscles of Joy.

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Storytelling is shaped by wide ranging elements: slips of register, authority, tense, tropes. Its profound ability to contextualise experience (past and present) makes it highly attractive to political and cultural hijacking. Peter Gidal’s seminal essay ‘Anti-Narrative’, 1978, underscores this point and also makes the beautiful contradiction of bookending his titular polemic via a series of anecdotes. Few, it seems, can escape such tendencies towards narrative.

MAP 20 forms its own crooked path through a number of narratives: a first-hand confessional by artist Alastair MacKinven reflects upon the daily practice of painting; Henry Coombes explores surrealised histories, exposing his shift towards a cinematic future; João Maria Gusãmo and Pedro Paivaorchestrate finely wrought mythologies on film; while the MAP Commission by Ginataras Didziapetris takes a more direct approach by exploring oral culture’s relationship to ethnography. The creation of a narrative structure is not perhaps solely compelling, but the way in which the aesthetic enterprise of narrative has become atomized, undermined and reinterpreted by numerous artist practices in recent years does, nonetheless, warrant some timely attention. The resurfacing of narratives within performance appears to have particular resonance in the work of Lili Reynaud-DewarSpartacus Chetwynd and Mark Leckey. Subtly, the constant unfolding of narrative presents new paths to navigate the distance between the physical archive and user-generated content. 

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With this summer's big art events behind us, MAP looks forward to the final months of 2009 with a collection of in-depth features and reviews. This issue’s commissioned artist, Clunie Reid, creates an audaciously lyrical dialogue between found and collaged images over eight pages. Meanwhile, our artist’s contribution from Ellen Cantor gives us a vivacious insight into her ongoing film project in an extensive monologue text.

Elsewhere, Chris Sharp analyses the history of destruction, putting into context the tropes of a number of contemporaries. Editor-at-large Isla Leaver-Yap examines the legacy of Eva Hesse and her influences on a selection of young female artists, and Michelle Cotton unpacks complex historical narratives colliding in Stephen Sutcliffe’s video work.

History is what matters to John Calcutt in his investigation of Transmission’s archive as the ubiquitous gallery approaches its 25th anniversary. Bringing things up to date and furthering MAP’s commitment to the most exciting developments in contemporary art, Joanna Fiduccia highlights the work of neo-conceptualist Etienne Chambaud in a monograph that positions his practice within a wider frame of reference, art duo Tatham & O’Sullivan reveal another side to their practice in an interview with Mona Casey and Adam Szymczyk reports from the Athens Biennial in an analytical focus report. Finally, Jane and Louise Wilson, showing at Talbot Rice Gallery as part of this year's Edinburgh Art Festival, give MAP an enigmatic back page. 

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A limited edition cover for MAP Issue 18, celebrates both the 53rd Venice Biennale and the latest MAP commission: Martin Boyce, the artist selected to exhibit at the Scottish pavilion this year, has created 11 pages around his new work, which incorporates the prose of novelist Haruki Murakami. To obtain a free copy of this special edition as part of a sensational subscription offer (a one year MAP subscription for only £12), contactinfo@mapmagazine.co.uk for details.

The regular issue, with its own, unique cover, has been designed to recognise MAP's contining focus on emerging artists: this issue includes writing on the work of Glasgow-based Stina Wirfelt, New York-based Peter Simensky and London-based Leigh LedareLuke Fowler, his first major solo show in the UK opening at the Serpentine this month, is among other artists featured, while Phil Collins, his first major solo in Scotland showing at Tramway through May, presents a MAP back page using an image originally produced to advertise the filming session for the 'world won't listen' in Bogata, Columbia, 2004.

This summer, MAP welcomes a new roster of editorial advisors, while offering a big thank you to outgoing members for their much-appreciated support during their tenure. 

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Things have changed, for now. But how do we make sense of it all? An artistic continental drift seems to be shapeshifting into nebulous and uncertain territory.

Perhaps it is reassuring to know that artists are used to living with uncertainty, and that trying to ‘make sense’ of the here and now is integral to creative practice and development.

These times beg a serious reassessment of where the business of art, as well as the function and viability of the artist, is heading. Individual practice is necessarily entangled in the economy of culture, and once familiar systems of dissemination and exchange, are being rearranged.

The new order may not yet be apparent but its configurations now seem infinite. For some artists the reinvention of ‘the new’ seems more possible than ever.

An interest in the past, meanwhile, is a staple of art practice that is most effective in its abstract form. The cut-and-paste of social, philosophical, theological and aesthetic ideas signal new territories that question and test out options which may just give us some surprising answers. 

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These are difficult times, but times have always been difficult, haven’t they? The current seismic shifts in the financial markets don’t simply trickle down to artists and audiences—they change the entire landscape on which cultural and social structures can also be built.

Change is good, isn’t it? The axiom of the art world as recession-proof is crumbling in the face of such change. Language is changing too. Those comfortable millennial terms of criticality—neoliberalism’, ‘post-Fordism’, ‘late capitalism’ to name a few—suddenly sound like markers of a period that has just recently become the past.

But what of terms like ‘artist’ and ‘critic’? How and where are they repositioned upon a fluctuating site of economic bafflement? What is possible to produce now that was not before? It appears the contemporary critic’s role has, rather limply, ended up at odds with its own self-reflexive criticality. The artist meanwhile has often assumed or consumed the latter’s role within a widening field of practice. Information and history—primary materials for both the artist and critic—have apparently been giving the ‘whole picture’. Now both artist and critic can test such a claim and reconfigure the present picture.

We have histories (both familiar and foreign, fresh and stale) at our fingertips, and opportunities to revise, to reassess and to learn from them. What is important is that we question relevantly, precisely, and contingently. Our history now writes itself as it happens—no more waiting, just urgency and instant feedback response. This isn’t simply the 21st century marching on from the 20th. Thankfully, this is something the best artists seem to be aware of.

The change in modes of production is imminent. Change is good. 

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The intersection of art and writing, with all its antagonisms, collaborations, and crossovers, shows a marked co-dependence. While the autonomy of the art object has shown to be lacking in some instances, a far more complex relationship with language and writing has emerged in recent contemporary art practice. The emergence of a reflexive curatorial discourse seems in part the artists’ response to the increasing layers of communication possible through technology.

Critic and historian TJ Clarke wrote with caution and cynicism that our image-culture was replacing an experience of the world mediated by words. Yet Clarke’s gloomy prediction has so far been unwarrented—it appears that the word/image relationship is inextricable, dialectical, dogmatic and fecund.

Conversation, as a strategy employed in its most direct sense by prolific writers like Hans Ulrich Obrist, and by editors of out-of-the-mainstream journal/magazines such as The Happy Hypocrite’s Maria Fusco and Dot Dot Dot’s Stuart Bailey, has been led by inquisitiveness and a desire for experimentation and engagement in all forms of art writing.

This issue, MAP celebrates these complexities. Hans Ulrich Obrist’s interview with Jordan Wolfson retains the creative spontenaity of their recent conversation in New York. Dot Dot Dot’s MAP Commission, conversely, condenses a collection of ideas into a dense layering of ideas. The resulting essay in pictures and in words, builds a map of connecting thoughts and images, beautifully constructed on both aesthetic and study-friendly lines.

In this issue’s Report, Maria Fusco playfully introduces the notion that art writing has somehow been ‘born again’ into a new generation of young artists and art writers with some radical ideas on its purpose.

And, for the first time, MAP asks its readers to join its ongoing conversation by posing a set of questions on feminism. Replies will be posted on the MAP website.

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Since MAP launched three years ago, it seems that cumbersome and occasionally absurd portmanteaus have become the only way to characterise the unforeseen intermixing of art, exhibition and market. Terms like ‘biennialisation’ and ‘glocal’ have been born, while others such as ‘national’ and even ‘international’ seem to be on the wane. ‘Salon’ and ‘public’ are on the rise once more, while the creativity of naming further trends never seems far from the tomorrow’s archive. And despite recurring accusations that an elite of artworld types hop from one country’s biennial to the next, audience figures have since shown that the biggest audience for international shows has been local. With predictions pointing towards the end of cheap overseas travel, the co-ordinates for Planet Art will be mapped anew.

The antagonism of inter/national remains foregrounded in the free market economy of contemporary art. And it was clear from the tone of the recent Glasgow international, which after six years has been positioning itself on the threshold of an international circuit, that Glasgow is enlarging its appetite for artists and audiences far beyond the city limits; there was a strong message that this would be as much to benefit the ‘local’ art and art visiting community as much as the exhibiting artists.

Reflecting upon this geographically stressed position of an indeterminate multitude of scenes, this Issue MAP interrogates the work of artists working against the hum of this ‘internationallocal’. Emerging artists, Ben Jones and Ann Bowman are based the USA; Jones is an infiltrator of the comic book, Ann a plunderer of mainstream film. Isla Leaver-Yap discovers rich seams from a national past in new work by Polish artist Paulina Olowska. The enigmatic work of Henrik Olesen is examined by Bergamo curator Alessandro Rabottini, and Scott Myles comes under the scrutiny of Lilian Haberer and Regina Baruke. Both Olesen and Myles feature in MAP’s first commissioned publication, created as a link between Glasgow international and berlin biennial 5

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Map is on the move! Broadening its commitment to contemporary visual art at home and abroad, the magazine takes up a two year residency at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, while the editorial team, as the new publishers, have developed a programme of exciting projects, commissions and related MAP publications. 

Issue 13 continues to develop Studio8’s vibrant new look for the magazine. Inside, we catch up with Adam Szymczyk and Elena Filipovic in the run up to the 5th Berlin Biennial (bb5) to discuss biennials today. Features on Craig Mulholland and Torsten Lauschmann examine these Glasgow-based artists’ practices in anticipation of major solo shows. Our regular commision series features exclusive work by Alasdair Gray in the magazine and online animation by Mulholland. In addition, Isla Leaver-Yap dissects the idea of monument and Victoria Miguel reportsfrom New York.

Throughout 2008 the magazine will expand, not only its page numbers, but also its remit. 

Coming up in February, MAP’s Visible Cinema, curated for Glasgow Film Festival 2008, follows last year’s sell-out programme and features Turner prize winner Mark WallingerRosa Barba and Duncan Campbell among other highly respected artists. Later on in April, a MAP publication and talk coincides with Glasgow International and bb5, bringing together new artist commissions. See our website for details.

Now independent, MAP would like to thank The List magazine for the significant part it has played in the development of this contemporary art title during its first three productive years under its direction.

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In a dozen issues over three years, MAP has under taken a journey in contemporary art which has commissioned and encouraged new writers in Scotland, London, New York and Berlin, published interviews with established internationally renowned artists such as Gustav Metzger and Douglas Gordon, discussed work by new European artists such as Victor Man, and featured young emerging UK talents such as Ruth Ewan and Duncan Marquiss. MAP is also committed to commissioning artworks on both pages and website—Donald Urquhart and Chris Evans being the most recent. From our Scottish perspective, out of the centre and yet with an ambition to discover new identities, MAP’s independent voice is a visible one. 

This issue, Richard Forster creates a MAP commission with a set of six remarkable new pencil drawings which pull together contradictory myths of pastoral and urban origin. As well as being sensationally detailed, the work is at once unsettling, beautiful and challenging. Forster has designed these pages to create a presence in the magazine which exhibits and explores the visual content, rather than explains it. 

We also explore the work of young Glasgow sculptor Karla Black, painter and installation artist Enrico David, and photographer Oliver Godow, in perceptive articles written Barry SchwabskyIsla Leaver-Yap and John Calcutt respectively.

Finally, we would like to thank Studio8 Design, for mapping out a brand new framework for the magazine as it moves into 2008.

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Against the ever increasing tide of institutional global art gatherings, a quiet yet powerful spirit questions the identity of a whole landscape of manmade sculpture—the West Lothian bings—as they age from industrial site, to heritage area, to artwork, on a journey of transformation which is leading inevitably towards their reclamation by nature. Artist and writer, Craig Richardson, plots and revisits the late John Latham’s conceptual journey into these emotive landmarks, breathing life into this daring project.   

This issue artists are also out on the High Street, in pavilions, gardens, galleries, biennials and festivals. Our roster of artists includes two Romanians—Victor Man and Monika Sosnowska, both of whom challenge notions of space and how art is expected to fit into it. Man’s extended painting installations are examined by Italian curator Alessandro Rabbotini, while Sosnowska’s giant works and tiny models are put together by Glasgow-based writer Moira Jeffrey. On the surface of it, Tony Swain has a more traditional approach, but Isla Leaver-Yap finds his painted collage works unique.

The Map Commission brings the lovingly cast characters of Donald Urquhart’s drawings to the page along with the story of his regard for them. While Andy Warhol’s large retrospective opens at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Urquhart’s work takes the notion of celebrity and graphic portraiture into his own hands, creating a nostalgic, decadent reference to times past in black and white.

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Map has expanded. In Issue 10 we are delighted to include a special eight-page insert compiled by artist Chris Evans, based on an extension of his recent work Militant Bourgeois: An Existential Retreat.

During the life of this issue, this year’s mighty European art shows are all taking to the contemporary art world stage in June. To witness this unprecedented explosion of curatorial activity, artists and art professionals from around the world will congregate at the many openings, some aiming to make it ‘a grand tour’. To reflect this serendipitous season of major events—the 52nd Venice Biennale, the five-yearly documenta, the ten-yearly skulptur projeckte münster and annual Art Basel 38Map profiles and interviews a group of artists, all of whom, despite being at different stages in their careers, are keenly active and engaged with contemporary issues today. 

Sculptor Martin Boyce was in our sights early once his name was announced by Münster. Lucy Skaer, selected to make new work for Scotland’s pavilion in Venice, among a roster of fine young Scottish artists, all of whom are exhibiting internationally —Charles AveryHenry CoombesLouise HopkinsRosalind Nashashibi and Tony Swain—has a story to tell. Kate Davis, making a solo statement at Art Basel 38 with vibrant Glasgow gallery Sorcha Dallas, has had a solo show recently at Tate Modern. Into this mix, we included the powerful images of Aernout Mik, another Venice exhibitor. 

That was the plan. Then Gustav Metzger came into the picture in conversation with curator Hans Ulrich Obrist. A highly revered conceptual artist, who began making ground-breaking, politically-connected work in the middle of last century, he continues his work today with no less energy and boldness. 

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MAP asked art writer Duncan McLaren, who has been contributing his popular ‘Journey’ series since the magazine’s launch in 2005, to help create a selection of special features. Using the theme of the Enlightenment as inspiration, the result is a fascinating combination of commissions, analysis, theory, reviews, rants, and, above all, imaginative engagement, which Duncan introduces here:

In the summer of 2006, for one of his Edinburgh Festival proposals,Peter Liversidge suggested to the Ingleby Gallery that he install, fromthe high wall of Edinburgh Castle to the Scott Monument, a deathslide. The idea was that a T-bar seat would be suspended from a length of steel wire, and that people would be able to sit on the basic seat and take a ride between the castle and the monument. This was one of about 100 proposals—some more practical than others—that Liversidge came up with. Today, I’ve climbed the 287 stone steps that take you from Princes Street Gardens to the top of the Scott Monument, pictured under this text, both to admire Liversidge’s site-specific-idea anew and to come up with something of my own.

I propose to install light slides from the Scott Monument to sites associated with the Scottish Enlightenment.

Again the idea is that T-bar seats will be suspended from lengths of steel-like wire, though in this case a green light bulb will be screwed into the base of the T. Readers of this issue of Map will be able to sit on the rudimentary seats and take rides from this giant tribute to Scotland’s most celebrated writer to sites of Enlightenment interest that have been recently investigated by contemporary artists. Amongst other destinations, wires will stretch to doggerfisher, where Graham Fagen has been exploring the myth of Robert Burns. To Newhailes House, where Tatham and O’Sullivan have been extending the myth oftheir own work in a preserved 18th century setting. And to Glasgow’s Lighthouse, where several artists have been collaborating with architects with a view to throwing light on the cultural geography and intellectual history of Edinburgh.

The golden era that began in the middle of the 18th century and lasted into the early 19th is supposed to be the one time in history that Scotland was at the vanguard of human thought and culture. Was it really so switched-on then? Is there any connection between those days and where we are now?

Every word of this issue concerns contemporary art, as ever, and every word can be related back to the Scottish Enlightenment, thoughsome by the merest gossamer thread. Let the contents page direct your progress. But remember, knees tight together while enjoying the ride. 

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The emphasis on international and market success is ever increasing in the contemporary art world. Isla Leaver-Yap’s report on Frieze (page 4–6) examines that trajectory and the benefits and pressures that global and commerical status bring not just to artists, but also their art. 

Now nearly two years old, Map  is set to publish an online directory of artists, curators and gallerists working in Scotland, many of whom are plugged into that international system. In this issue, we have drawn together a number who represent current activity and trends. It is not a definitive list. We have included not only established artists/curators but also those who are at an earlier stage in their careers. In bringing these people and organisations together in one place, we hope that our ‘snapshot’ choice provides a starting point for piecing together an art map for Scotland. 

The new archive can be accessed on the Map  website (www.mapmagazine.co.uk) and will be updated regularly to include current exhibitions/events in each entry—so if an artist is showing work in Paris or Glasgow, we’ll pass that information on. This list complements the already online comprehensive listings of exhibitions in Scotland, and those of importance and interest around the world. Scotland’s trade, industry and intellectual past has traditionally had an outward looking view of the world. Today, artists are increasingly encouraged in art schools and colleges to connect with the international market— outcome in the making for several decades. 

In the 1960s Alexander Moffat and John Bellany looked towards Berlin for inspiration; in the 1970s Richard Demarco brought Eastern Europe andBeuys back home; in the 1980s Steven Campbell and the ‘Glasgow Pups’ pioneered trade with New York particularly; and in the 1990s Douglas Gordonand other Glasgow Art School graduates caught a slipstream to the rest of the world alongside the YBAs. As art fairs and biennials gain in number and importance, this new century’s first decade is all about the market and as art becomes more of a commodity, with values increasing in the West as new markets, such as China and India, rapidly establish themselves in competition. Is art then in danger of loosing its vision as it gains power as a commodity?

It remains to be seen whether the burgeoning international financialisation of contemporary art finds unequivocal welcome in Scotland’s culture.

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On page 60 writer Barry Schwabsky says that every capital needs an airport, a football stadium and a contemporary art museum. You could add major international art fair or bienniale to that list of 21st century city essentials. In this issue alone we have reports from Bucharest Biennale4th Berlin Biennale and Art 37 Basel. But despite increasingly confident moves by Glasgow International, now held biennially in May, Scotland has yet to put a major international visual art event on the global circuit. 

Does it matter? In many respects, not a bit. On his journey on page 24, Duncan McLaren suggests that because of a ‘lack of a significant commercial sector in Scotland, artists are not distracted from doing robust work—work that comes across as ambitious, relevant and attractive to the people who commission public art and curate shows in major spaces’. Scottish artists are taking heart at home with events like the Backgarden Biennale, page 8, enjoying grass-roots philosophy at its most literal—a wholly ecological, humourous approach. In the feature section of Map, Alex Kennedy talks to an Edinburgh group of artists who successfully work to their own blueprint, leading them to establish their own Embassy, a gallery with strong affiliations to Edinburgh College of Art, yet with a rebellious, tongue-in-cheek confidence of its own. 

Entering its third year, the Edinburgh Art Festival strengthens the public profile of the visual arts during the time of the biggest festival on earth (the Edinburgh International Festival and Fringe create the gigantic centrepiece for a host of others in August). Its main efforts however are concentrated on publicity and creating a platform, with individual galleries providing the curatorial highlights—among them, American abstract painter Robert Rymanat Inverleith House, Matt Stokes at the Collective and David Batchelor’s off-site work with Ingleby Gallery. Alongside it, the Annuale, an off-shoot fringe made by artists for artists, provides a young, dynamic crucible where anything can happen. 

But it is perhaps significant that the work of one of the most celebrated contemporary artists in Edinburgh this year, Douglas Gordon, flies clear of visual art festivals altogether. His film of footballer Zidane (feature page 28, review page 59) is part of the Edinburgh International Film Festival and goes on general release in September.

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Two Scottish artists from the same generation, both known for tireless self-belief, originality of character and whose work we will not forget, died this spring. Ian Hamilton Finlay, who celebrated his 80th birthday last year, is remembered in the feature section of Map, by his son, artist and publisher, Alec FinlayIvor Cutler, born Glasgow 1923, died London 2006 aged 83, did not perhaps attract the same level of international acclaim, but nevertheless had a devoted following of ‘Scotch sitting room’ dwellers. Map’s writer of art journeys, Duncan McLaren, would like to say a few words here.

‘Cutler studied at Glasgow School of Art and became a teacher in Paisley, but leaving Scotland he said “was the beginning of my life”. Nevertheless, there is a bleak and painful affection for the human beings he grew up with that is apparent in his art. 

‘His views on aspects of his upbringing are made hilariously apparent in Life in a Scotch Sitting Room, Volume 2. (There is no volume one). A typical episode involves the children of the house each being given three grains of sand, and blowing from their salted mouths onto each others faces, in lieu of a day out at the sea-side. Young Ivor is given the big quartz grain, in recognition of the fact that his kilted grandfather had newly bled the boy’s nose with a punch. By holding up a mirror, however distorted, to the Glasgow of his time, Cutler did us all a service.’ 

In its second year, and from now to be biennial (surely a relief to its organisers), Glasgow International 2006 opened late April with Ross Sinclair’s continuing, colourful search for real life. The REAL LIFE Painting Show, at CCA, along with art from the charismatic chanteuse Patti Smithat the Mitchell Library, and a new gallery space for Mary, Mary, all included in this issue, were among the highlights of a contemporary art festival quietly continuing to gather pace.

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Entering its second year, Map continues to plot the visual arts over Scotland and its international cultural landscape. Traditionally, a new year looks ahead. So, Christine Borland, an artist linked to science this issue, brings her latest explorations to the city at the Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh this coming winter. Richard Demarco, crusading as ever, battles to keep his latest venture, a gallery beside the sea and a nuclear power station, afloat. Glasgow's attractions continue to inspire an increasing number of resident artists, musicians and artist-run galleries, producing talents like Simon Starling, represented by the Modern Institute, which celebrates its second Turner Prize winner in a row. Looking ahead to future issues, Douglas Gordon, who emerged onto the international art scene in the 1990s, returns from New York with the National Galleries of Scotland. 



As movement and international opportunities increase, so the job of curator becomes more powerful, defined alongside the artist, morphing the dictionary meaning of the word 'official in charge of a museum, library etc.', to become an integral part of the contemporary artist's life and work. Curator and artist are now often celebrated together. But while the temporal bodies of the art world entertain and maneuver, the effect of the art itself as a force of the imagination and change continues, creating work with a potential to inform the future and live on in it. It is that perennial potential at the beginning of this new year which is cause for our celebration.  

#4 - December 2005 Review

Edinburgh Art Festival and Annuale 2005

Various venues citywide during August 2005
#4 - December 2005 Review

Katy Dove

Metrople Galleries, Folkestone 11 September-23 October, 2005
#4 - December 2005 Review

Dana Schutz

Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin 2 September-1 October, 2005 
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The steady march of film, video and other screen-based work into the gallery continues. Not long ago they were outsiders, experimental, eclipsed in one world by the big screen and in another, more tangible art mediums. Nowadays, flickering pictures play a part in many exhibitions, either standing alone or more frequently, as part of a multi-media display. In this issue, Ilana Halperin at Edinburgh’s doggerfisher, draws immaculately, but also films her sources. Rosalind Nashashibi, a young artist, selected for the British Art Show 6 at Baltic in September, has recently spent eight months in New York filming. She too draws, but is increasingly associated with a delicate translation of ordinary life on screen. At a time when moving picture technology is so available that everyone can be a director or viewer on a mobile phone, artists like these seem more inspired than ever to explore its potential. At the Venice Biennale, little movies are everywhere, many of them showing remarkably straightforward responses to life, not quite documentary, but exuberant, insightful snippets by gazing, grazing eyes cast over a crowd, a culture, a cup of tea. Some are intimate, some scary. Some demand time, others a moment. Some are immediate, others contrived. Just when we thought TV had us jaded, artists offer new ways of seeing. And to prove it, Threshold, a new gallery devoted to video and film, opens in Perth in September. 

Still photography too continues to make a mark. David Michael Clarke and Shauna McMullan have used it on journeys to document and then patch a work together. Eva Merz, and Daziel+Scullion use it on a larger scale, the former collaging, the latter producing advertising billboards. As examined in MAP 3, both have courageous political messages to send with their images, precious and valued commodities in a world of useless ones.

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In October 2005, writer/sculptor/artist Ian Hamilton Finlay is 80. Poet Edwin Morgan and sculptor George Wyllie reached that decade some time ago. Continuing to create work of outstanding lucidity, these three prolific men, from their different corners of the art map and with creative voices honed over years of practice, inform and inspire new generations. From the lush tranquil beauty of Little Sparta, his garden on a Lanarkshire hillside, Finlay is preparing to exhibit at the Ingleby Gallery and Inverleith House in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh this summer. Wyllie takes a Cosmic Voyage to the Collins Gallery in Glasgow in August and Edwin Morgan, the 'Scots Makar', adds new poems with star spark, to his sixty year constellation—MAP is honoured to have one specially written this issue for Ian Hamilton Finlay's birthday. Having spent lifetimes exploring the contours of their lives, these artists now have a map of work which takes them from youth, to first success, to established figure, to guru, and remind us that 'contemporary' means now. 

On the other side of the mountain from these 'contemporaries', Nigel Peake, the young artist/architect introduced in MAP Portfolio, is just about to embark on his career with a visionary package on board, manifested in the thousands of sketches he's already made. Lotte Glob, who has chosen to live on the edge of the country among the mountains, literally melts rock into artforms: once rejected by the metropolis, she offers her work back to the land that has inspired her and has become her studio and gallery.

Close to the passion for life and nature that all of the above artists share, an open source computer game designed by artists Chad McCail and Simon Yuill gives us all the opportunity to vandalise the society we have, for the good. Experimenting gamers can ban school, fill the rivers with fish and create their own utopias, manipulating the spring_alpha map to discover their own creative solutions to modern life. Offering a window of opportunity, McCail and Yuill take 'contemporary' into the future.

Map 1

Maps describe boundaries and ownership. They plot destinations and show us the way. They follow terrain and stars and thoughts. Who has not been absorbed in a map? In an increasingly global, electronic culture, maps are more resonant than ever, their very specific logic and beauty often appropriated by artists and art events. Zenomap, the first national presentation of new work from Scotland at the Venice Biennale 2003, was one such, so named after the brothers Zeno, two Venetian navigators who allegedly sailed west from Scotland and charted new territories 90 years before Columbus.

Now, in another Venice year, the new contemporary art magazine Mapcontinues the process of drawing together and celebrating art and artists in Scotland, while connecting to exhibitions and artists around the world; a process that stretches back at least as far as the ‘Strategy-Get-Arts’interventions in Edinburgh over 30 years ago, and into the future with Glasgow’s new international art festival in April, 2005.