MAP

Kim Coleman and Jenny Hogarth

The collaborators talk about their current fellowship and upcoming projects

Kim Coleman and Jenny Hogarth, 'If you can’t see my mirrors I can’t see you’, 2010, single-channel video. Courtesy the artists

Kim Coleman and Jenny Hogarth, 'If you can’t see my mirrors I can’t see you’, 2010, single-channel video. Courtesy the artists

"We are working on a commission for This Is Not A Performance Or A Lecture!, as part of series of events for Radar at Loughborough University. It’s a live work using eye tracking technology, and we work with a team of researchers from the university to complete the project. We are currently finishing the installation of two existing videos, ‘Glare (heater)’, 2009, and ‘If You Can’t See My Mirrors I Can’t See You’, 2010, for the exhibition Young London at V22 in Bermondsey.
 

The Creative Scotland Fellowship 2011 with the National Gallery of Modern Art is supporting us in the research of some new ideas. We have just begun the fellowship, and we’re looking into the Modern Art gallery’s collection and its incredible archive. The fellowship is an opportunity for us to take the time to develop our research further. Works in the collection that use once-new technologies or materials (‘hypotechnology’), and those with an experimental approach to the use of reflection and repetition, are interesting. From Matisse’s ‘The Painting Session’, 1942, in the Gallery of Modern Art, to Dan Graham’s two way mirror sculpture outside the dean Gallery, we are aware of how both approaches relate to the way we make our own work. Beside the collection itself, we have an interest in working with the technology used in the galleries—archiving equipment, CCTV, video cameras, monitors, computer programmes and mirrors. We are thinking about re-staging and revealing aspects of the gallery and its collection, and allowing the viewer to see themselves and the gallery in alternative ways.
 

We are examining in detail ideas relating to looking and being looked at. A lot of our previous videos, events, and installations used technologies that augment our ways of seeing, and we’re interested in creating works that reveal how technologies relate to the performativity of people, places and objects. Now we are investigating how context can become the subject of the work, effectively changing the experience of viewing from spectacle into a participatory event, where mise-en-scène becomes the material of the work."

Young London, V22, London, 28 May–30 July, This Is Not A Performance Or A Lecture!, Radar, Loughborough, 18 June